Tag Archives: Ann Peters

Ann Peters, a Tease for Mr. Teas

28 Mar

The other week I re-watched Russ Meyer’s The Immoral Mr. Teas and whilst watching I suddenly realised that, out of all the female Meyer alumni, it’s this early part of his career in which the ladies he used I know very little about. So, I’m going to set about undoing this and start doing blog entries over time in which I try to find out as much as I can on those ladies that sometimes get forgotten about over the likes of Tura Satana, Erica Gavin and Kitten Natividad. First up, Ann Peters.

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Peters is one of the models used in Meyer’s aforementioned first feature from 1959. Whilst initially struggling to find models for his film, Peters was bought to the attention of Russ by fellow Hollywood/Glamour photographer Earl Leaf, who regularly used her as a subject. According to Jimmy McDonough in Big Bosoms and Square Jaws, Peters was working as a Vegas showgirl at the time but I can’t find anything online about this. In Teas Ann plays the coffee shop waitress, clad in a low plunging black dress, and pops up again later on in the film as one of the bathing beauties Mr Teas encounters down by the lake. Needless to say she’s absolutely gorgeous, and was apparently Russ’s favourite from the shoot (the dreamy shot of her swaying in a hammock, natural light pouring down on her, is one of my favourite in Meyer’s career). Sadly the two didn’t work together again afterwards.

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A simple internet search will reveal quite a few pin-up shots of Ann, of which I’ve found a fair amount. Alongside Leaf, she was also shot by Guy Tyler of Hollywood, as well as others, no doubt, that I can’t find information on. Some of her magazine credits include Stare (1958), Fling (1958), Men In Danger! (1964), QT (1960s), Modern Man Annual (1963), Tab (1965) and Sable (1959). Below are photographs from my favourite shoot of hers.

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Next to her appearance in Teas, IMDB lists Ann with a few other film credits, including The Fourth Wish (1976), Pink Nights (1985), Erotic Dreams (1988) and Desperate Measures (2011). I can find little else on her life or career but believe she now resides in Adelaide, Australia and runs her own casting company. I’ve tried to get in touch to no avail but I’d love to find out more about her and her experiences so please get in touch if you know anything! Or get in touch yourself Ann!

To finish I’ve included a link to an 8mm stag film that I found of Peters. There’s no title or date but I know that it is one of a few that she did. Another that she starred in, Salvador Dolly, I can’t find online but know that it is included in this DVD compilation. Again Peters looks gorgeous and this loop is a delightful mixture of demure innocence with a dash of knowing playfulness. I love it, and I know that a lot of other people will too.

https://archive.org/details/Blonde_2

 

MEYER MONTH – ‘The Immoral Mr. Teas’ (1959) review by Jonathan Henderson

13 Sep

Lets be honest, I spend a lot of hours surfing the web for anything Russ Meyer related, sifting through the good, the bad, and the wierd. During some model investigating (which I hope to share soon) I stumbled across this great review of Meyer’s first feature The Immoral Mr. Teas which I had to share. Written by Jonathan Henderson, the original link can be viewed here, but I’ve also copied it below.

The Immoral Mr. Teas might not be the first film title that comes to mind when the name Russ Meyer is mentioned, but it may have been the most important in his career and, indeed, the most important for the genres in which he’d spend most of his career working in. Released in 1959 with a budget of just $24,000, Mr. Teas eventually grossed $1.5 million, which helped to finance Meyer’s subsequent films outside of the help of the major studios. But it was also a watershed (on a relative level) in the world of film as it was the first film to unapologetically feature nudity in a film that wasn’t completely underground and pornographic, or under the guise of a “naturist/nudist” film. It essentially opened up the floodgates for what would become sexploitation, but Mr. Teas itself seems harmless by today’s standards.

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Its relative tameness perhaps has to do with the fact that it’s less sexploitation and more “nudie cutie”, which exchanged actual sex for simple nude eye candy. Mr. Teas is likely typical of such a film; it stars Bill Teas as Mr. Teas, a door-to-door dental supply salesman who’s frustrated by the drudgery of his daily life. During his day, Mr. Teas encounters three hot women: a Coffeeshop Waitress (Ann Peters), a Dental Assistant (Marilyn Wesley), a Secretary (Michelle Roberts), a girl on a beach (Dawn Danielle), and a Burlesque Dancer (Don Cochran). As his day wears on, Mr. Teas begins fantasizing about the women, seeing them in various situations unclothed. Fearing that something might be “wrong” with him, he goes to a Psychiatrist (Mikki France) who is quite hot herself.

If this doesn’t sound like much of a plot… well, who am I kidding? It’s not. But—and perhaps it sounds odd to say this—there is a peculiar charm to the film. Meyer doesn’t even attempt to present a dramatic narrative; instead, the film is shot with a narrating voiceover (Edward Lasko) and a revolving jukebox of jazzy music numbers (a mid-tempo march, a sexy sax refrain, and a few up-tempo pieces) that accompany the images as if it was a silent film. In truth, the film plays out like what would happen if Jacques Tati shot a nudie cutie; the film even has Tati’s sense of social satire. But while Tati was purely visual in his parodying of modern grossness and confusion, Meyer uses the voiceover which mimics the “informational” voiceovers in the exploitation films at the time that tried to preach a moral by presenting the “dark side” of what certain actions lead to.

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But there’s also a certain innocent joy in the film’s appreciation of the female form. Perhaps the most successful scene in the film doesn’t even feature nudity, but has Mr. Teas attempting to go fishing at the local beach when he spots the “Beach Beauty” who seems insistent on taking off her top. But this is probably where the homophonic “Teas” (as “tease”) comes into play as Meyer’s camera never actually catches the woman naked. Perhaps the most extraordinary bit in the sequence has the “Beach Beauty” playing in the ocean as the tide rolls in; there is a definite but intangible beauty to the scene. It almost brought to mind those first few moments when I became unconsciously aware of the female form. It’s hard to call such a scene “exploitation” because there’s no sense of the woman being exploited. Rather, this is Meyer taking in the beauty of nature no differently than if someone were to film a sunset.

While not every scene has that level of (dare I say) aesthetic grace, Meyer keeps it light, comical, and satirical enough that it would be hard for even the most rigorous Puritan—Ok, maybe a moderate Puritan—to ever feel ashamed. It’s perhaps telling, though, that Meyer never actually shows his gallery of busty beauties naked in reality, but rather only in the imagination of Mr. Teas. The film also takes its time (relative to its already short 63 minutes) before it even gets to the nudity. This allows the majority of the first 2/3 to play out as a comedic satire of both modern society, and the types of exploitation films that preceded Mr. Teas. The absurd voiceover certainly has its genuinely hilarious moments as it plays counterpoint to the witless Mr. Teas.

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For all its pleasantries, the film is far from perfect; even at a slim 63 minutes it feels a bit repetitive and “light”. The constant musical accompaniment eventually goes from humorous to annoying (though, thankfully, it’s never egregiously so), and Bill Teas himself seems a particularly unappealing “hero” for the film. I don’t know, there’s something about him that just doesn’t make him a sympathetic everyman. Meyer may do everything he can to frame the film like a Tati, but Bill Teas utterly lacks Tati’s carefully measured, but seemingly effortless, physical gifts for comedy and his innate charm. If anything, he makes the film appear much sleazier than it is. Meyer does just about everything he can, but he’s yet to develop his cinematic talents that will serve him much better in his later films.

Even with the complaints, this is still an interesting film from a historical standpoint, and a rather enjoyable film in-and-of itself. It’s certainly not superb from any angle, but it’s undeniable that the film has more substance and quality than the vast majority of its ilk.